Shelley Widhalm

Posts Tagged ‘Setting’

Mountain fires and writing with fire

In 52 Writing Topics, Motivation, Passions, Shelley Widhalm, Writing on July 1, 2012 at 11:00 am

The High Park fire as viewed from Fort Collins, Colorado.

When the wind rode my laptop screen as if it were a sail, pushing my years of work across the table and onto the cement ground, I panicked.

Had I saved my latest work on my flashdrive? What if I lost a few pages, a few poems or a short story?

This was before theHighPark fire struck northernLarimerCounty, smothering the air in my hometown with the smells of a campfire gone wrong. From a lightning strike, thousands of burning acres. Evacuees. Lost homes. Harmed wildlife. A story that is becoming too large to imagine, at least from the outside.

I am writing about fire, a project I started in January nearly six months before my environment became engulfed in the smell, the texture (ashes drop like gray snowflakes), the sight (the smoke rises off the mountain as if from a chimney) and the taste and sound of burning .

My character in “Dropping Colors,” has lost her home in an apartment fire and is on the quest to find her lost things. A few of theHighParkevacuees had the chance to grab their essentials and most important personal things. Kate Letts, my character, does not get that chance and becomes reflective about the meaning of stuff.

Writing is about stuff, about loss and gain and about fire and the flame that lets the words burn. That burn will be revealed in my six-month review of blogging about 52: A Year of Writing Basics, Beliefs and Beauty.

Here’s the stuff, or what is essential to writing: Plot, Setting, Character, Dialogue, Voice, Pacing, Flashbacks, Scenes, Arc, Storytelling. The elements of fiction that are the pieces of wood in a fire.

The match is that initial idea for a character identity, an outline for a story or a snippet of something seen or overheard with the unanswered What If?

Strike the match to that pile of wood symbolizing the writer’s blank page. The spark is the inspiration, motivation, creativity and imagination that ignite the initial idea into flow.

Flow is the opposite of writer’s block, which is the state of mind when words refuse to come.

Flow is losing track of time, place and whatever evokes the senses and getting lost in the telling of the story. For me, it’s almost like reading, because I am not in complete control, though I am conscious, at least somewhat, that I am writing.

To stoke the fire to last until the next writing session, find a good stopping point in the middle of a scene or a chapter or an idea. That way the flame can be picked up to continue the writing burn.

Stoking the fire is keeping to a writing schedule. It is discipline. It is putting time into the craft and art of storytelling.

To keep on writing, there needs to be goals, a belief in the self and the knowledge that this is a rough draft. Just as the main character has to face her flaws, fears and limitations and overcome them to get what she wants, the writer has to work through the same things.

That’s what passion is, doing this thing you love without ever giving up. Despite heartbreak. Despite being told your work is ashes. Despite not having a home for your words.

Writing is Catching Fire, Running with the Wind and Being Wild with all the elements of fiction, so that what results is a thing of beauty. From fire comes a myriad of colors that cannot be washed away. It becomes part of the text, so that the readers lose track of their own settings, identities and stories of their lives.

A Writer’s Quarterly Review

In 52 Writing Topics, Plot, Quarterly Review, Shelley Widhalm, Writing on May 6, 2012 at 11:00 am

Businesses do it for survival, but I figured as a writer, I could glean my own form of a quarterly review.

I’ve just finished month four of my yearlong blog of 52: A Year of Writing Basics, Beliefs and Beauty.

A little late, my review is three months, plus one.

Each week, I am tackling a writing topic, starting with the basics of Plot, Setting, Character, Dialogue and Pacing to fire up the big guns in my writer’s toolbox.
The BIG guns, you ask.

Before opening the toolbox, I want to key in on the essentials of writing a story or novel.

There has to be a hook in the beginning that contains a strong inciting incident. This incident triggers the main character’s problem or submerges him or her into trouble. She wants something but has to face obstacles that block the path to obtaining her goals and desires.

The telling of her story begins in the middle of the action to achieve a level of pacing that draws in the reader. The exciting moment is what gets readers turning the page, which likely won’t happen if the telling is bogged down with back story or has to start at the beginning without anything interesting happening.

Wherever they appear in a story, flashbacks should retell what happened before the story’s action begins and are triggered by something specific, such as a character seeing an object and remembering something because of it.

The story unfolds as a series of scenes strung together with a beginning, middle and end, or the arc of the entire telling. The outcome of each scene is what moves the plot forward.

What the story is about and why it matters is the theme, which offers insights or comments about the human experience.

The setting grounds the character in his or her reality without drawing too much attention to the words.

Voice comes through word choice and how words are put together to describe things.

Unlike that of the author, a character’s voice is revealed in her behaviors and attitudes to those around her. Her dialogue is reduced to the essentials, leaving out the normal repetitions, tangents and diversions that occur in regular conversation.

The elements of fiction are just one aspect of my toolbox, as are my hammer, nails, screwdriver and pliers that represent my paper, pen, laptop, journals and the other things I need to do the writing.

The specifics of what is in a writer’s toolbox will be continued to next week, because my quarterly review has two parts. Like some CEOs, I need lots of paper to make a point.

* See Zoey the dachshund’s blog on her four-month review at http://zoeyspaw.wordpress.com/2012/05/06/a-dogs-quarterly-review/

A Novel Setting

In Setting, Shelley Widhalm, Writing on January 29, 2012 at 10:00 am

The setting of a novel fits the cliché that too much of a good thing is definitely too much.

It’s best to give description of time and place in moderation. Provide the snippets that ground the character in his or her reality without drawing too much attention to the words.

It would be like reading by looking at the individual dots of each letter, looking at each letter and then coming up with the word – just a tad too time consuming and boring.

The idea is to get readers wanting to find out what happens next.

You don’t need to describe a map of streets with rows of businesses, stores and houses detailed down to the last shingle, as well as every piece of clothing on your character as if you’ve just dressed her up like a Barbie doll.

Instead, try a well-phrased sentence or paragraph or two or a literary description of the character’s surroundings to add color and dimension to her world. This description of setting is necessary to establish a story’s mood, feeling, historical period and location.

To give a description, use any of the five senses – sight, taste, smell, hearing and touch – to draw out what is happening in the character’s world. What does the chocolate chip cookie she just baked smell like? How does its buttery taste crumble on the tongue, leaving you wanting seconds?

Through description, the character is giving her sense impressions of the colors, sounds, flavors, odors and feelings of the things within her environment.

As she describes these things, she reveals her relationship to her environment, which is essential to ground her in the plot of the story.

Is she a big city girl stuck in a small town? Does she like the open prairie but is living in the mountains? Or is she interested in being a novelist but stuck doing her day job?

Here are a few questions to ask about a character’s relationship with the setting:

  • Is she limited by or at odds with her environment? Or does she love where she lives, including her zip code and type of residence?
  • How does her external world relate to her internal world? Her internal world consists of her thoughts, feeling, beliefs, fears, memories and other psychological factors, while her external world is everything she senses outside her body.
  • How does her setting influence her identity and behavior?

The key thing to remember about setting is the old adage of show, don’t tell. Let your reader experience the time and place of your created world, rather than telling them as if giving dictation to the steady rhythm of a metronome.