Shelley Widhalm

Posts Tagged ‘Camp NaNoWriMo’

Camp NaNo motivation/discipline

In Camp NaNoWriMo, Writing Discipline, Writing Goals, Writing Motivation on July 31, 2016 at 11:00 am

Writers are supposed to be self-disciplined and motivated to write, right?

Not always so, and certainly not always easy with writers’ block, a limit of time or place, and life getting in the way.

That’s why Camp NaNoWriMo in April and July is a good option to offer that discipline and motivation with a bit of competition. The writing challenge offers writers working on novels, short story collections and other writing projects a numbers goal and a deadline. Writers pick how many words they want to write for the month and have 30 or 31 days to finish the count, depending on the month.

Writers can choose to be put in camps with other writers who have similar projects or goals, and can measure their progress in a group setting. I set my goal at 20,000 words, and because I like to do what I set out to do and hate last-minute writing, I reached 17,400 words by July 20. And then I thought, “oh well, whatever,” and skated through the rest of the month, writing less frequently with fewer words during each writing session. I was a little tired, though not less excited about writing.

I worked on a collection of short stories with the same setting of a coffee shop, tentatively called “Coffee Shop Tales,” and I finished one story and wrote eight more during the month. In April, I worked on the same project but spent most of it writing a 15,000-word neither-here, neither-there project that I have to cut or lengthen to be an actual short story or a novella or novel.

Here’s a sampling of my writing days (as pulled from my journal):

  • July 6: I wrote 2,060 words in one-and-a-half hours, finishing a short story that was kind of strange.
  • July 11: I wrote 1,090 words in 40 minutes and am at 8,230 words for Camp NaNo, so far writing seven out of 11 days. I edited the story and added another 135 words.
  • July 13: I wrote 2,280 words in one-and-a-half hours.
  • July 20: I worked on finishing a short story and wrote 1,540 words in one hour, feeling good that I wrote and could solve the problem of the story’s direction. Later in the day, I wrote 1,540 words in an hour, finishing a short story in that time (and accomplished writing 3,140 words in one day, my record so far). It was kind of fun, and the voice was a little different.
  • July 28: I wrote a short story and wrote 2,830 words just to get the Camp finished. I reached 20,700 words exactly!

I love Camp NaNo, because you get to choose your goal and get some motivation and discipline as you work toward it, all within a month.

Writing fast for Camp NaNo

In Writing, Writing Discipline, Writing Inspiration, Writing Motivation on July 24, 2016 at 11:00 am

Camp NaNoWriMo is a way to write fast, focus on word count and get a project started or continued without worrying about perfection.

Being a perfect writer slows the process, because what if there’s an error at the sentence level or in the overall structure?

To see the whole, it’s necessary to write through all the parts. And then each of the parts—plot, character, voice, dialog, setting and theme—have to be edited and revised to tie together the whole into a great story with all the elements pulling in the reader.

Earlier this month, I was reluctant to sign up for Camp NaNoWriMo, because once I set a goal, I have to meet it, and I get a little anxious trying to get there. But my friend signed up, and I was like, “Oh, all right,” not to her, but to myself.

I signed up because I want to finish a project that seems to be treading water, a collection of short stories tentatively called “Coffee Shop Tales.” Though I have the same setting for the collection, the stories are lacking a narrative thrust toward some major event as I’d originally planned.

The advantage of Camp NaNoWriMo—offered in April and July where writers encourage each other on their personal writing projects—is the automatic discipline of announcing a goal and feeling obligated to meet it.

In April, I worked on the collection, going 100 words over my goal of 15,000 words. This time, I’m aiming for 20,000 words, upping the challenge with the hope I can write through to that major story event.

Fast writing is a way to retain plot, character and setting, because the project is constant, not something to go back to days or weeks later.

It’s a way to freewrite with an idea of the elements of the story in mind, so the writing remains structured.

And it’s a way to get into the zone, letting the imagination take over. It’s almost like reading because the characters and plot do the work—even though you’re there, the writing is so quick one thing plays off the next.

The writing becomes intuitive. It may be coming from the subconscious. It can bring up surprises. And then one thing happens and the next and the next …

Taking on the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge

In NaNoWriMo, Writing, Writing Goals, Writing Inspiration, Writing Motivation on May 1, 2016 at 11:00 am

A friend of mine kept sending emails about signing up for the Camp NaNoWriMo challenge, and I was reluctant to even try, feeling burned out on writing.

But after half a dozen emails, I was like, “Fine, I’ll do it. I’ll take on the challenge.”

Camp NaNoWriMo is a virtual writer’s “retreat” in April and July where writers encourage each other on their personal writing projects, forming cabins or groups as a virtual writing group and community.

The camp is open to multiple writing projects, such as new novel drafts, revision, poetry, scripts and short stories. I decided to continue working on my short story collection, tentatively called “Coffee Shop Tales,” with all the stories set in the same coffee shop with something tying them together at the end (though I don’t know what that is, being a pantser writer).

Campers set a word count goal between 30 and 1 million. I didn’t get started until May 5, when I signed up and set my goal at 15,000 words. I’ve done NaNoWriMo twice before, meeting the goal to write 50,000 words, but I wasn’t up to that fast of a pace for writing. I was kind of tired of writing, but somehow by having a goal and just doing it I felt reenergized and excited about my project.

My aim became writing words, so I lost the editor and the insecurity and let the story come out as it wanted to (rough and sloppy with the idea that revision is for later). I loved seeing my words tally up, and that inspired me to keep going.

Camp NaNoWriMo keeps track of your average daily word count (mine at the end of the project was 520 words, though I wrote nine days with a count ranging from 550 words to 1,000 or 1,500 most of the days).

On my first day, I wrote 1,150 words. On day 10, I was up to nearly 5,000 words. I got kind of busy, so faced a time crunch on April 27, when I was at nearly 11,000 words.

The next day on April 28, I got to 12,600 words, leaving 2,400 words for April 29. Since my birthday is on April 30 and I wasn’t going to do anything but have fun, I had to get those words in that day—I divided the count into two writing sessions and wrote more than 2,500 words.

I concluded the month with what I thought was 15,135 words, but the device that tallies final word count said I had 15,090 words.

I wonder where the other 45 words went. It doesn’t matter, because I lost my burnout (and those words, too) and am inspired to write again.

Thanks Camp NaNoWriMo.