Shelley Widhalm

Unlimited with Shrinkage? (plus thoughts on writing)

In 52: A Writer's Life, Shelley Widhalm, Writing on August 25, 2013 at 11:00 am

(My slightly off-topic rant from my regular exploration of writing, the writing process and being a writer)

The rant part: A couple months ago, I bought an Android smart phone with unlimited text and talk, but the salesperson “forgot” to mention my plan was unlimited with shrinkage.

Quite convenient for the corporation to be unethical and employ bait-and-switch practices, while also claiming that I had been informed via the sales call and a text message that my unlimited plan (i.e. infinite, boundless, unending and unrestricted, according to Webster’s) is not actually unlimited but carries with it the conditions of shrinkage, or that of growing smaller.

Granted, the word “shrinkage” was used in my welcome-to-your-lovely-new-plan message, but I hadn’t been smart enough to notice the word or the lie. I unwittingly took my place in the line of customer victims of corporate greed.

Shrinkage, in fact, is a product of the recession: food portions have shrunk, while prices have escalated (no free enterprise system is at play here, but that’s another topic of corporate greed and dishonesty); quality has decreased, particularly for fall-apart clothing from big-name retailers; and electronics and appliances have been designed to slow down or break, coupled with the constant need for upgrades.

What I’m talking about is products with poor quality, while the process is that of ___ (fill in the blank with “greed,” “money hunger,” “power hunger” …) to fill CEO and stockholder pockets.

Few strongholds remain against this voracious exploitation of humanity – everyone ends up being someone else’s customer.

The writing part: One stronghold against this shrinkage is the process and product of writing. Writers, or at least the ones who aren’t pumping books solely for profit, care about both product and process (see last week’s blog, “The Process vs. Product of Writing”), the result of which is an industry that isn’t out for power, profit and prevarication.

That is, we are unlimited in our desire to write when it is a passion, even during episodes of writer’s block, when there is no shrinkage (because we eventually will return to writing).

Writing is a process of a first draft, followed by several revisions, as well as of reading, living, experiencing and doing other writing to feed our main writing projects – for example, journaling and writing down inspirations and thoughts can inspire and lead to larger projects.

As for product, we aren’t trying to sell someone short but work hard to find an audience; after publication, we promote our product, do readings, continue building our platforms and write some more.

We do this, because we love both the process of writing and of reaching our readers, or customers of words and stories. We’re not trying to rip them off as the experience of both the process and product of writing becomes shared.

The experience is unlimited, without condition, because when good writing is being written and then read, a multitude of meanings and understandings unfold. This product is one that allows readers to read it once, come back to it again, ponder upon it, and not feel rejected, ripped off, used, manipulated or any of that, because it’s about being real, honest and true.

Advertisements
  1. I am proud to be a writer! Often I think about writing as a profession but something holds me back—fear of losing the passion and love I have for the art. I will never stop writing and if people want to pay me I would love to accept. But to me, it’s more important that I like my writing and that other writers respect me as a writer. Writers are the best readers 🙂

    • I agree that writing is an end in itself. I couldn’t imagine life without writing, even if it’s just my journal. I have to write. I also have to read, and I find that reading makes me a better writer, and writing makes me a better reader. What do you think?

      • reading a writing are both practices of our community. for an obvious example, if no one read blogs, just posted posts then it wouldn’t be a community. I agree with what you said. much love!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: